National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Issues Official Statement on Steroids and Performance Enhancing Substances

Organization Supports Bans on Controlled Substances, Severe Penalties for Violators and Increased Education for Professional and Student-Athletes, Parents and Coaches

DALLAS, March 24 – As the principal point of contact for drug testing programs in high school, college and professional sports teams, certified athletic trainers (ATCs) are health care professionals who often see the first signs of drug use among young athletes. To express its concern with the issue of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances in sports today, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), a not-for-profit organization that represents 30,000 members of the athletic training profession, has issued an official statement. NATA supports bans on steroids and other controlled substances not prescribed by a physician for therapeutic purposes, and more severe penalties for those who violate imposed regulations or bans. “A n equally important weapon in the battle against steroid use,” says NATA President Chuck Kimmel, ATC, “is a thorough education of our professional and student-athletes, parents and coaches on the serious health problems they can cause now and later in life.” Not to be confused with personal/fitness trainers, who focus almost exclusively on fitness programs, ATCs specialize in the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries that occur to athletes and the physically active. “One of NATA’s concerns is the health and safety of all athletes, which we believe are compromised by the use of such substances,” says Kimmel. “Due to the health risks associated with steroids and other performance enhancing drugs, NATA will never justify their use to improve athletic performance.” Kimmel believes professional and student-athletes, parents and coaches need to become better aware of the nearly 40 health problems that steroids can cause now and later in life, including: increased aggressive behavior, depression, altered menstruation, acne, male pattern baldness, enlarged heart, liver tumors and suicide. “Increased research, combined with more intense dissemination of the facts about the extreme health risks, will help deglamorize steroid use and solidify the message that no on-field victory is worth compromising your health,” he says. View the NATA official statement here. ATCs throughout the country are celebrating National Athletic Training Month in March promoting the message: "Rehabilitation: Accelerated Return to Activity." About the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA): Certified athletic trainers (ATCs) are unique health care providers who specialize in the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses that occur to athletes and the physically active. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) represents and supports 30,000 members of the athletic training profession through education and research. March is National Athletic Training Month. www.nata.org. NATA, 2952 Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 200, Dallas, TX 75247, 214.637.6282; 214.637.2206 (fax). Official statement on steroids

 
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